Friday, December 9, 2016

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Windows Server Migration Tools Requirements

Windows Server Migration Tools Requirements

Windows Server 2003 or R2 Requirements
  • At least 25 MB
  • .NET Framework 2.0 + SP1
  • PowerShell 2.0

Windows Server 2008 Requirements
  • At least 25 MB
  • Install PowerShell Windows Server 2008 R2
  • At least 25 MB

Windows Server 2012 Requirements
  • At least 25 MB
Guides and more information can be found on technet

Monday, January 12, 2015

Windows Server 2003 support ends this year

Windows Server 2003 support will end on 7/14/2015!

If you are still running Windows Server 2003 feel free to contact me regarding your upgrade/migration options.  *Note: You cannot upgrade from 3003 to 2012!

Of course Microsoft would like you to go to the cloud...

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/server-cloud/products/windows-server-2003/

Friday, November 14, 2014

Windows 10 Technical Preview Fundamentals for IT Pros



Windows 10 Technical Preview Fundamentals for IT Pros


IT Pros, want a sneak peek at enhancements in Windows 10? Get a technical overview, and find out how these improvements can help you meet your enterprise IT and security challenges, including device management, multifactor authentication, and deployment, plus a familiar UI for end users.

In this Jump Start training with live Q&A, join us as the lead Windows 10 Enterprise Product Managers roll back the covers on the Windows 10 Technical Preview. Learn about new UI enhancements, find out how management and deployment is evolving, and hear how new security enhancements in Windows 10 can help your organization respond to the modern security threat landscape. Be sure to bring your questions!

(NOTE: You can preview Windows 10 before the course. Install on a non-production machine, rather than on your primary home or business PC.)
Read more


Course Outline:
  • Windows 10 Technical Overview​
  • Windows 10 Management and Deployment
  • Windows 10 Security



Click Here to go to Microsoft Virtual Academy Live Events



Friday, May 2, 2014

Windows End of Sales

End of sales

End of sales refers to the date when a particular version of Windows is no longer shipped to retailers or Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs). Examples of OEMS are Dell and Toshiba—PC manufacturers who often preinstall Windows software. When a version of Windows reaches its end of sales date, it's a good time to think about upgrading.
This table gives end of sales dates for specific Windows operating systems. 

Client operating systems and updatesDate of general availabilityRetail software end of sales * End of sales for PCs with Windows preinstalled
Client operating systems and updates
Windows XP
Date of general availability
December 31, 2001
Retail software end of sales *
June 30, 2008
End of sales for PCs with Windows preinstalled
October 22, 2010
Client operating systems and updates
Windows Vista
Date of general availability
January 30, 2007
Retail software end of sales *
October 22, 2010
End of sales for PCs with Windows preinstalled
October 22, 2011
Client operating systems and updates
Windows 7 Home Basic, Home Premium, Ultimate
Date of general availability
October 22, 2009
Retail software end of sales *
October 31, 2013
End of sales for PCs with Windows preinstalled
October 31, 2014
Client operating systems and updates
Windows 7 Professional
Date of general availability
October 22, 2009
Retail software end of sales *
October 31, 2013
End of sales for PCs with Windows preinstalled
Not yet established **
Client operating systems and updates
Windows 8
Date of general availability
October 26, 2012
Retail software end of sales *
October 31, 2014
End of sales for PCs with Windows preinstalled
Not yet established
Client operating systems and updates
Windows 8.1
Date of general availability
October 18, 2013
Retail software end of sales *
Not yet established
End of sales for PCs with Windows preinstalled
Not yet established

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Windows lifecycle fact sheet


Every Windows product has a lifecycle. The lifecycle begins when a product is released and ends when it's no longer supported. Knowing key dates in this lifecycle helps you make informed decisions about when to upgrade or make other changes to your software. Here are the rights and limits of the Windows lifecycle.


Client operating systemsLatest update or service packEnd of mainstream supportEnd of extended support
Client operating systems
Windows XP
Latest update or service pack
Service Pack 3
End of mainstream support
April 14, 2009
End of extended support
April 8, 2014
Client operating systems
Windows Vista
Latest update or service pack
Service Pack 2
End of mainstream support
April 10, 2012
End of extended support
April 11, 2017
Client operating systems
Windows 7 *
Latest update or service pack
Service Pack 1
End of mainstream support
January 13, 2015
End of extended support
January 14, 2020
Client operating systems
Windows 8
Latest update or service pack
Windows 8.1
End of mainstream support
January 9, 2018
End of extended support
January 10, 2023

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Windows 7 or 8?

I'm often asked which OS should I go with.  Windows 7, or Windows 8?


As an enterprise, the operating system of choice is clear: Windows 7. 

As of right now, the lack of apps made specifically for Windows 8 undermines the usefulness of the changes, and the state of many companies' hardware – laptops and desktops without touchscreens and sporting older internals – makes Windows 7 the obvious option.

Home PC? The choice is not so clear.

If you prefer to keep your software up to date then upgrading to Windows 8 may be the next logical step, as everything moving forward will become exclusively compatible with Windows 8. If you've already invested in the Windows ecosystem – through Windows Phone, for example – then Windows 8 will make a lot of sense, both aesthetically and functionally, as the two sync well and the user experience is almost identical, bar desktop apps.